Data and Insight

We know that sport and physical activity can have a positive impact on individuals, communities, and society as a whole.

We use a range of research and data sources to understand the current picture in North Yorkshire, to help guide our investment, support, and programmes. This data can be accessed by anybody who wishes to understand more about sport and physical activity in our county.

Active Lives Survey

The Active Lives Survey measures the activity levels of people across England.

There are two surveys: Active Lives Adult, which is published twice a year and Active Lives Children and Young People, which is published annually.

Both give a unique and comprehensive view of how people are getting active, including their activity levels, sports preferences, and barriers preventing participation.

Find out more about the surveys by clicking below. A user-friendly tool allows you to access the latest survey results and filter data by demographics, location, and activity types.

https://activelives.sportengland.org/

https://www.sportengland.org/know-your-audience/data/active-lives

The current picture in North Yorkshire

According to the most recent Active Lives Survey (Adults 16+, Nov 2021 to Nov 2022):

  • 459,300 (66.5%) of North Yorkshire residents are currently classed as ‘active’, completing the recommended 150+minutes of activity per week. This is a 0.8% increase over the last 12 months.
  • 78,100 (11.3%) of North Yorkshire residents are currently classed as ‘fairly active’, taking part in 30-149 minutes of activity per week. This is a 1.3% increase over the last 12 months.
  • 153,200 (22.2%) of North Yorkshire residents are currently classed as ‘inactive’, taking part in less than 30 mins of activity per week. This is a 2.1% decrease over the last 12 months.
  • Whilst the numbers are moving in the right direction, there has not been a statistically significant change over the last 12 months. However, national figures have improved at levels deemed to be a significant increase.

If you’d like to find out more about the Active Lives survey results and the other data resources we work with, please click here (link to delivery partner version? Where info is more detailed?)

Active Lives Children and Young People Survey

Sport England’s Active Lives Children and Young People survey runs annually and captures the sport and physical activity behaviours of 5-16-year-olds in England. The latest national results (covering the 2021-22 academic year) show that activity levels have recovered to pre-pandemic levels.

Overall, 47% of children are meeting the Chief Medical Officers’ guideline of averaging 60 minutes or more of sport and physical activity per day.

The recovery in North Yorkshire falls behind the national trend with 42% of children being classed as ‘active’, which is still below pre-pandemic levels.

The results provide further evidence of the positive impact physical activity can have on mental health, with an increase in the proportion of children exercising to relax and worry less, and socially for fun with friends. However many inequalities continue to affect both activity levels and attitudes towards physical activity, exacerbated by the impact of the cost-of-living crisis.

No one solution or project will address these levels of inactivity, and we continue to work collectively through schools, community partners and health services to create the conditions for children and families to be physically active on a daily basis.

See how we are working with children and young people on our What We Do pages.

You can read more about the Active Lives Children’s report over on the Sport England website.

Growing Up in North Yorkshire survey

Another data source we use is the Growing Up in North Yorkshire survey. This survey is designed to capture the views and experiences of children and young people in North Yorkshire. By using this data, we can gain a better understanding of the factors that influence young people’s participation in sport and physical activity, as well as their attitudes towards it.

Link to latest findings

Demographic data

National data indicates that activity levels have recovered following the impact of the pandemic, however below the headline data, it is clear that inequalities are widening. Some key points from the latest release include:

• Activity levels are back to pre-pandemic levels which is much better than was expected
• People feeling they have the ‘opportunity to take part’ are yet to recover fully.
• Activity levels and wellbeing levels continue to be linked (more active = better well being scores)
• Anxiety levels are higher, with the ‘cost of living crisis’ a contributor.

Find out more about activity levels across different demographics in North Yorkshire.

Our Impact

Our annual Impact Report highlights our work and its impact on the health and wellbeing of the people who live in North Yorkshire and York.

Watch the full video or read our written version. We hope you enjoy!

Understanding our sport and physical activity providers

Working with partners across North Yorkshire and York, our annual Sport and Physical Activity Provider Survey aims to understand the health and development needs of sport and physical activity providers in the area.

Now in its 6th year, the survey generates valuable insight about general club health, membership, workforce, development goals and training needs. This helps to shape our support to the sport and physical activity sector as well as providing a county-wide picture.

Useful Links to Insight and Data Tools

There are many data sources available that help us to understand the current picture in York and North Yorkshire.

Below is a list of tools and resources you may find useful to examine activity levels, health and wellbeing and a range of demographic data. These tools can be helpful when planning projects, targeting new types of people, or preparing funding applications.

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Looking at what the data tells us in more detail show variances in who you are and where you live.
There are many data sources available that help us to understand the current picture in York and North Yorkshire.
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